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Credit where credit is due on #PedagooFriday
Uncategorized
May 27, 2017
0

You’re probably aware of our end-of-the-week hashtag #PedagooFriday.  The idea is to create a space on Twitter where teachers can share a positive experience from their classroom and, perhaps, develop a happier tone at the end of the week.  It’s been quite a week.  Nuff said.

As this week’s Duty Moderator, I noticed that several tweachers posting links to blogs about their practice in their #PedagooFriday tweets and I’ve taken the liberty of producing a summary here.

If you’re interested in tech, you’ll be interested in @stirdigilearn’s post. The EduTechScot2017 conference took place in Glasgow and the event focused on STEM learning through digital technology and how it can be harnessed by educators to equip themselves and children with the tools to succeed. Sounds interesting, right? See the Stirling Digital Learning blog post for a concise review of some of the cool resources encountered at the event. See the #EduTechScot hashtag on Twitter for even more information about the conference.

Tech in the form of visualisers seemed to be flavour of the week, appearing in posts from two teachers at schools in different parts of the UK.

Firstly, @MrMarsham tagged a post on @BedfordAcademy’s ‘Teaching and Learning Showcase’ blog which contains a collection of shared teaching and learning ideas contributed by staff from Bedford Academy in Milton Keynes.  In his post ‘My best friend, the visualiser’ Dave Marsham explains how he makes use of this piece of tech to model and to give feedback on answers in Maths and History lessons.

Secondly, @mrsjmasters tagged a tweet from @HuntResearchSch about a post by Dr Susan Smith, Science TA at Huntingdon School and Biology Tutor at York College.

Huntingdon School is one of Education Endowment Foundation’s (EEF) Research Schools Network.  Work funded in schools by EEF claims that metacognition and one-to-one teaching are cost effective, high impact means of raising attainment.  A focus group recently held at Huntingdon School tried to define metacognition and what it looks like in practice. It became clear that teachers wanted examples of what metacognition means in practice. In her post called ‘Becoming a (Metacognitive) Teacher Part 1’ Susan outlines how she uses visualisers in combination with a virtual learning environment (VLE) with her students. Part 2 is also available on the school blog.

A piece of practice-based enquiry was referenced in a tweet from @TeacherBS14, twitter handle for the web page for teaching and learning at St. Bernadette Catholic Secondary School in Bristol.  In this case, the blog post outlined an action research project into scaffolding and differentiation in Art with Year 8, Year 9 and SEND nurture students undertaken by Art teacher Teresa Hove.  This is Teresa’s first year in the secondary sector after a move from primary.

Last, but by no means least, our very dear friend and inventor of the #PedagooFriday hashtag @kennypieper  published ‘What’s Grown Ups Going to Think?’.  Here Kenny eloquently explains why social media should be welcoming space for all teachers.  Hear, hear Kenny!

In terms of this particular collaborative blog, if it’s about your teaching practice, we’d like to help share it.  You can cross post.  Yes, we’re more than happy to accept posts that appear on other blogs. Otherwise, you can write something just for us. There’s certainly a big Pedagoo audience out there, with currently over 32 thousand followers on social media.

It’s good to share, and it’s the entire raison d’être of the Pedagoo community. Come blog with us! http://www.pedagoo.org/newpost/

The Story of Me – increasing vocabulary recognition.
Uncategorized
May 18, 2017
0

I am a primary school class teacher, based in Scotland. I teach Primary 2 (age 6 -7 years).

I designed the Story of Me project to promote recall of vocabulary. It was inspired by an article I read recently by Turk et Al (2015) which found that children were more likely to recall target vocabulary if it was used in sentences where they themselves were the subject of the sentence.

At the same time I had been doing lots of work with my class on improving their drawings of themselves. I had been modelling the step by step process I would take to draw a person and discussing with them all the elements that one might think about when trying to represent somebody in an illustration and then, following on from that, how you might illustrate what they are doing in the picture.

I put together the project based on these on these two ideas to see whether co-authoring and the experience of being the subject of both text and illustration could make target words more memorable for children and also to see whether seeing themselves represented by an illustrator would improve their self-portrait skills!

I am currently studying illustration and I was engaged in this project as an illustrator as well as the class teacher (although the children were not aware that some of their stories were being illustrated by me!).

The model was as follows:

  • Identify target group of words for each child – these were a mixture of ‘high frequency words’ and ‘keywords’ from our reading scheme.
  • Children create sentences about themselves using these words.
  • Aspiring children’s illustrators were recruited to work (virtually) with the children in the class – they draw one illustration for each child’s sentence per week.
  • Child is created as a central character so each sentence becomes part of a story about them.
  • Aspiring illustrators gain experience in the creation of a character and placing that character in different situations each week.
  • Illustrations come back to the children via email or online sharing.
  • Over the 4 weeks of the project the children will compile a special book (either a paper book or an e-book) containing an illustrated story about themselves.

The primary aims of the project were as follows:

  • Children develop a strong relationship with the target words and recall them accurately.
  • Illustrators model good quality drawing and illustration for the children and the children develop their ability to draw figures and faces.
  • Illustrators gain experience creating a character and placing it in different situations.

Other intended outcomes:

  • Children get a taste of the collaboration of author and illustrator.
  • Children gain a better understanding of the work of both an author and an illustrator.
  • All children see themselves in the role of an author – they have written a book!
  • Children’s ideas are valued and celebrated.
  • Children themselves are at the centre of the story – they are important and interesting.

The project is now complete and you can see a compilation of our wonderful stories at http://bit.ly/StoryOM2.

There is also a summary of the findings and outcomes of the project against its intended aims.

I hope you enjoy The Story of Me!

Susannah Jeffries

Twitter @mrsjteaches

Instagram @MrsJDraws

 

Children’s Library Club
Uncategorized
May 10, 2017
0

“Children can only aspire to what they know exists.”

Glasgow Children’s University, 2016

This statement illustrates the philosophy behind the Children’s Library club, offered to pupils of St Mungo’s Primary School every Wednesday from 3 o’clock, with students from the School of Education at the University of Strathclyde having full responsibility for planning, organising and running this experience.

St Mungo’s Primary school is located directly behind the university library, but the 5 minutes walking distance between the 2 buildings is ultimately a barrier between two separate communities. Although the physical distance is minimal, the distance metaphorically is immense and the prospect of the University campus was abstract to the pupils in St Mungo’s Primary, many of whom were actually unaware of its size, opportunities offered and even its existence. This is further highlighted in that I, as a student entering my fourth year of study, was equally unaware of the existence of the school.

This after school club enabled children to see for themselves the wonders of the huge library, specifically the vast range of children’s books covering a variety of exciting topics and the technology and research methods that could be utilized to help them make interesting and relevant discoveries.

Through inviting groups of pupils into our library, supporting them in researching topics of interest, and encouraging them in team work while being independent in their own learning, we hoped to enlighten pupils to the captivating environment offered in the University. 4 weeks of exploring informative resources, increasing knowledge and enthusiasm and co-creating presentations to display this, accumulates in a visit from parents, who are also invited to the library to see for themselves the experience their children have had.

We hoped the experience would reintroduce the university, the library, and further education as a whole, as things pertinent and accessible to everyone, regardless of their current social, economic, political or cultural status.

Being the initial organiser and key point of communication between the school and the university, I had the opportunity to immerse myself in an experience which has enabled me to develop, not only an enhanced passion for books and working with children, but professional attributes which shall be utilised in my future career as a teacher and which shall be strengthened throughout my professional life. I feel I have gained vital experience of leadership as I took responsibility for the creation of the club, planning and organising timings, resources, considerations of safety and “housekeeping”, recruitment of fellow students and lines of communication to maintain the efficient running of the sessions. This in turn led to attributes of resilience and problem solving being developed as several obstacles were addressed and overcome: lack of communication and issues regarding commitment being just some of these.

As I was undertaking my final 3 month block placement in the months from January – March, for me this meant keeping in close contact with the students who had volunteered to run these sessions, ensuring the club was of a sustainable nature, instructions and advice being passed to successive groups.

The benefits reaped from this project were not only apparent in the children who took part, but also in the students from the university who organised and supported the sessions. Students across all 4 years of study took part in various 4 week blocks, working together, liaising with other professionals and experiencing numerous obstacles and challenges throughout their work, implementing skills of cooperation, problem solving and communication in order to address these and maintain the consistency of the club. The success experienced in this first year of the clubs creation has evoked a huge sense of pride in me and has ultimately given me the confidence to continue with opportunities like this in the future, taking a leadership role in other experiences that I find exciting and worthwhile that spark my personal interest and passion. The sustainability of the Children’s Library Club means that students who have taken part this year can go on to carry the club forward, using their prior knowledge and experience to influence its progression.

I sincerely hope this initiative will continue for many years to come as we continue to work together to collaborate the communities of university students and staff, and the parents, pupils and teachers of St Mungos Primary.

 

What do we mean by leadership?
Uncategorized
May 5, 2017
0

This is a more difficult question than you might at first think. If someone says they word ‘leadership’ to you, what do you first think of?

In my experience at least, for many teachers in Scotland the answer is ‘promotion’. We say things like ‘I’m not interested in leadership by which we mean ‘I’m not interested in promotion. But when you stop and think about it, that’s not what leadership means at all. We’ve all worked with classroom teachers who were great leaders of practice and we’ve all worked with young people who demonstrate fantastic leadership attributes. I like the following definition from a recent book chapter by Forde & Dickson (2017):

Leadership is an interactional process where influence and power are exercised in different ways, in different locations by different people across an organisation.

Given my job these days is supporting the development of ‘teacher leadership’ I find that we often need to begin by discussing the fact that great teachers demonstrate aspects of leadership in their role day in, day out. Here’s an example of this very conversation in action:

The question then becomes, how do you go about supporting the growth of leadership in teachers? If you’re a teacher in Scotland, SCEL has a growing offering. Firstly, there’s our *free* online framework for educational leadership. This has recently been enhanced and can be used to support teachers to develop leadership in their practice. You can even now download a record of your professional learning from the framework for uploading into your professional learning profile. Check it out now: scelframework.com

We also have a Teacher Leadership Programme on offer. This is free for teachers in Scottish schools and supports and challenges participants to take an enquiring approach to developing practice in their classrooms. We have been prototyping the programme this session and we are currently recruiting for an expanded cohort next session. If you would like to know more about this, including how to apply, check out our website. You can also keep up to date with our support for teacher leadership by joining our Teacher Leadership Network in Yammer.

In the meantime, one other way of course to develop your leadership as a teacher is to get involved in communities such as Pedagoo, TeachMeet and #ScotEdChat…why not begin by checking out the one and only #PedagooFriday today!

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