Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in comments
Search in excerpt
Search in posts
Search in pages
Search in groups
Search in users
Search in forums
Filter by Categories
Admin
Assessment
Book
Creativity
Curricular Areas
Curriculum
English
Expressive Arts
gtcspl
History
ICT
Ideas
Implementation
Inclusion
Involving Pupils
Leadership
Literacy
mag
Maths
Modern Languages
Numeracy
PE
Pedagoo
Pedagoo@PL
PedagooFriday
PedagooGlasgow
PedagooLondon
PedagooReflect
PedagooResolutions
PedagooSunshine
Primary
Professional Learning
Qualification
Research
Resource
Resource
Science
Scottish Learning Fringe
SLFringe
Social Studies
SOLO
TeachMeets
Technologies
tmlovelibraries
Uncategorized
xmasparty
String Thing – A way to stretch , challenge and engage
IMG_1852

Last week staff who are part of the GO Barnwell coaching project @GOBarnwell were each set their respective GO Gold teaching and learning missions. Some staff were allocated ‘string thing.’ I deliberately kept the title rather vague so that it could be open to a variety of interpretations allowing for creativity and an individualization of the task. My colleagues, Emma , Jackie and I have written up three different activities we devised within our own subject specialisms. We all found that our individual string thing activities stretched our students ,encouraging them to develop and use their high order thinking skills.

 

String thing – MFL

This string activity asks students to use thinking skills and categorise vocabulary. I prepared six grammatical categories (verbs, cognates, false friends, nouns, adjectives, pronouns). Each category must be linked to another with a piece of string. On this string students must place an individual item of vocabulary (which had already been cut out and placed in an envelope). For example, if one of the items were ‘visiter’ to visit, students attached this word to the piece of string that connected VERB and COGNATE. The task became harder when students had to use translation skills, discuss grammar and watch out for false friends (words that look/sound like English words which do not mean the same thing). Students had to use a range of skills involving, dictionary use, knowledge of grammar (both in French and English), guess work and team worThis activity was a huge success, students felt motivated, challenged and each had a role to play in their team. All Groups discussed grammar at length which enabled me to ask more challenging questions about the grammar system or play devil’s advocate. After preparation of this task, the whole activity was student led and independent. I would highly recommend this activity with the following advice: include sticky tape in your packs for vocabulary/ string to sit properly, include blank cards for students to write their own vocabulary (I gave bonus points to students that could include as many of these as possible)

 

B_bUWcDWwAExBpA

B_bUWLBWIAIE0PK

String thing – Geography

My GCSE Geographers were at the end of the Urban World topic which had included a large number of case studies. I was keen to draw out the similarities and differences between the different locations. I colour coded the case studies to show if they were in the developed or developing world and then stuck them to the two rows of tables. I then connected the locations to each other with string forming a sort of web. Students were then asked to come up individually throughout the lesson on a rotation basis and either note a similarity or difference between examples. Similarities were recorded on yellow and differences on green. Students then stuck their respective post -it notes onto the string which connected the two case studies they’d been asked to compare and contrast.I was able to differentiate by asking different students to work on particular combinations which were more tricky. This activity encouraged them to not only think about content linked to the current topic but also material we’d covered in the rest of the syllabus previously.

 String thing GeogGCSE 2

String thing Geog GCSE 1

String thing – Biology

My gold mission was to complete a “string thing” activity. I chose to create knowledge webs with year 11 to support their revision of the B1 and B2 units and help them to develop a deeper understanding of how biology “fits together”. I separated the students into pairs and gave them a topic within the units. They had 10 minutes to create a mind map of information about that topic. I then asked students to link their map with others with string and explain the link they had made on a placard stuck to the string.  They found the concept challenging and initially found it difficult to understand how the topics linked together. The students were really engaged in the activity and worked hard to find the links. Upon reflection, I think I left the task too open, I might improve it next time by providing some links that students can then put in the correct places to begin with. I will certainly use this activity again, it was an enjoyable and visual way to link concepts together to develop an holistic understanding of biology.

IMG_1755

 

IMG_0059

 

Stop motion videos to demonstrate learning
Screen Shot 2015-03-18 at 20.26.54

We recently have been lucky enough to get the use of five iPads in our biology department and we have been trying to integrate them into the classroom.  I recently came across the Lego stop motion app when making movies with my own kids and thought about applications for use in the classroom.  The app is free and I very easy to use.  My s4 class has used it to create videos to show their understanding of pyramids of energy, biomass and numbers.

My advanced higher class have used the app to demonstrate their understanding of cell and tissue culture.  

Both classes loved it.  They were very engaged in the activity and were on task throughout.  They shared ideas about what to add to the videos and showed me a few new features in the app that I didn’t know about.  

The advanced higher class worked in groups of 3/4 each choosing a different cell type to culture. They then shared their video with the rest of the class (using a vga cable and adapter linked up to the projector).  It made a great explanation tool for each cell type as well as a good revision tool.  It can be used in so many areas of the course and I plan to use it more and allow pupils to be creative in explaining what they have learned.  I have added a few of the videos (the ones without the kids in them) to let you see what they did.  We have to learn how to slow the videos down a bit but I’m sure the pupils can teach me this! Hope this helps

Sarah Clark

Arts learning resources from The Fruitmarket Gallery
Installation view Possibilities of the Object at The Fruitmarket GalleryInstallation view Possibilities of the Object at The Fruitmarket Gallery

The Fruitmarket Gallery is an art gallery funded by the taxpayer displaying exhibitions of work that are not for sale. The Gallery brings the work of some of the world’s most important contemporary artists to Scotland. We recognise that art can change lives and we offer an intimate encounter with art for free. The Gallery welcomes all audiences and makes it easy for everyone to engage with art. Gallery facilities include a bookshop and café. The Gallery is physically accessible and family-friendly.

As part of our learning programme, we produce free resources to help teachers, families and community groups to get the most out of each exhibition. Links to our resources are below.

The Learning Through Exhibitions series helps schools and community groups to explore exhibitions before, during and after a visit to The Fruitmarket Gallery. They can also be used for arts activities at any time alongside our other resources documenting the exhibition. Developed with artists and teachers, the series suggests ways to think with and through art and be inspired to make it. Creative Challenges are open-ended and adaptable to any age group. Covering artists including Louise Bourgeois, Gabriel Orozco, Jim Lambie and our current group exhibition of modern and contemporary Brazilian art Possibilities of the Object, resources cover curriculum areas including Expressive Arts, Literacy, Social Studies, Religious and Moral Education, Health and Wellbeing and Languages. Activities include dance, storytelling, poetry, drawing, sculpture, installation, music, film and photography.

Little Artists are activity sheets for families and primary school groups to explore and respond to the exhibition together. Activities include colour poems, storyboards and designing a display of sculpture.

Possibilities of the Object:

Stan Douglas:

Jim Lambie:

Tania Kovats

 Louise Bourgeois

 Gabriel Orozco

“I am very impressed by the learning resources available which accompany the exhibitions. They are comprehensive and motivating as well as being relevant to the curriculum.” Kathryn Malcolm, Teacher of Art and Design, Inverkeithing High School

“Mission Statement Morning”: Organising a whole-school, off-timetable event.
scott

Developing a true sense of community is a crucial yet challenging task for an international school. The wide mix of cultures, nationalities and religions, combined with a relatively swift turnover of students, makes it difficult yet essential to find a unifying set of values and objectives which helps students feel secure and respected.

Here at the International School of Toulouse, we gave serious thought about the best way to produce a school Mission Statement that the whole community – students, staff and parents alike – could formulate and therefore support. We were also keen to integrate this as far as possible with the IB Learner Profile to ensure that this too became an inspiring driver for school development rather than just a document in a handbook.

Our decision was to take the entire school off-timetable for half a day. During this time we engaged in a series of stimulating activities to get everyone thinking about the sort of school we are and want to be. We also used our Live Twitter Image Feed to share photographs of the work as it evolved. The result was a wealth of ideas and an initial mission statement that has given us an exciting sense of focus and direction for the new school year. The structure of the event is easily adaptable for other schools and we would strongly recommend that other schools try it out for themselves.

Screen Shot 2015-01-29 at 21.03.32

We began the day with a short school assembly that outlined the importance of framing a mission statement and provided an overview of the main steps to be taken. The first of these steps involved tutor groups meeting in their form classrooms for forty minutes with a teacher acting as the chairperson. For fifteen minutes, students brainstormed the question “What are the essential features of an excellent school?”. They did this silently as individuals, and then discussed ideas in small groups, before the teacher started listing ideas on the board. We found it particularly useful to encourage older students especially to think in terms of both objectives and methods by phrasing these ideas in the form “A good school aims to [do X] by [doing Y]”. For a further ten minutes, the class was given the challenging of reducing these ideas down to a ‘wish list’ of just nine points. We helped students do this by asking questions like “Are some of these ideas repeated on the board?” (in which case, we wiped one of them off and rephrased the remaining one as needed) and “can some of these ideas be categorised under a bigger heading?”. Finally, each student was given a copy of a “Diamond 9” template on A4 paper and arranged the nine ideas now agreed upon from the most important (at the top) to the least important (at the bottom).

Screen Shot 2015-01-29 at 20.58.17

The second stage of the event, lasting for one hour, involved turning these ideas into an actual mission statement. Students moved to different classrooms, taking their completed sheet of prioritised ideas with them. Rather than form groups, these new classes consisted of students of different ages that had been decided in advance and announced during the morning assembly. At this stage too, the teachers sat to one side of the rooms and a prefect chaired the discussion. In small groups, students started by comparing their diamond 9 diagrams to identify the most popular ideas that were starting to appear across the school. The prefect then asked each group in turn to contribute what appeared to be a popular idea until a list was built up on the board. This process lasted about fifteen minutes, after which the prefect provided each group with some examples of mission statements from other schools and the IBO Learner Profile. This led to a fresh round of discussion as we considered whether these materials anticipated our own ideas, or whether there were fresh ideas in these that we wanted to include. At this stage too, prefects invited ideas about what fresh elements we should add to the IBO Learner Profile, since this is something encouraged by the IBO itself. Finally, in the remaining twenty minutes each group in the room framed their own mission statement on a piece of A3 paper in jumbo pen based on their ideas, and then stuck these up on the outside of their classroom door to share with the rest of the school.

Screen Shot 2015-01-29 at 21.00.36

The final stage of the event, which took place after break time, enabled the whole school to share their ideas and vote on the most popular mission statement that had been produced. For twenty minutes, each group of students was guided around the school by their prefect and teacher to read the different mission statements and decide upon their favourite. At the end of this allocated time, students worked individually to choose their favourite mission statement and stand next to it. Prefects added up the votes for each statement and handed these to the teachers in charge. We then ended, as we started, with a short school assembly in which the prefects shared some of the suggested additions to our own version of the IB Learner Profile (ideas such as ‘hard-working’ and ‘creative’ were particularly popular). The mission statement from the group that gained the most votes was announced and then read out by one of its younger authors. This was also a chance for the school to give a round of applause to the prefects and teachers for their help in co-ordinating the event.

scott

The end result of this highly structured but stimulating event was that the first draft of our new mission statement has quite rightly been formulated not by senior managers working in committees, but rather by the students themselves. The next phase of the process, which will provide the focal point for the next 12 months of school development, will see the student council working alongside parents and teachers to develop a final draft of the mission statement and consider how it should be expressed in the everyday life of our school community.

Overall, the “Mission Statement Morning” was straightforward to organize, provided a refreshing change to the normal structure of the school day and produced some excellent ideas and insights. I’d strongly recommend other schools to give it a try and to contact us here at the International School of Toulouse (ist@intst.net) if you need any further guidance.

Links

A picture gallery of the Mission Statement Morning at the IST, June 2014

Handout: Instructions for teachers

Wonderful word towers!
German word towersGerman word towers

With a bottom set Year 9 German class, we had watched the film ‘Lola rennt’ (Run Lola, run) and were using the perfect tense to describe what had happened in the film.  We had spent quite a few lessons on this (it felt like an eternity!) and the class seemed to be getting it, slowly.  They had started to adapt the sentences to say other things too  The only problem was, they were getting really sick of it; any mention of the film title and their groans would fill the room!  As I entered the classroom on this occasion, I had some exercises planned, some whiteboard activities, even a cartoon strip, but I must admit that even I was starting to grow weary.  I spied a couple of bags of big ‘Mega Blox’ style building bricks that I had bought very cheap from Wilkinson at Christmas and on the spot I decided to change my plan and an idea started to grow!  I asked them to write on their bricks with dry wipe marker, using one brick per word and see who could create the longest sentence and therefore, the tallest tower.  They had also just learnt how to use connectives, so their towers had the potential to grow to quite a height!  They were mainly working in pairs (it is only a small class) and I dished out a handful of bricks per pair.  Once they got going, they started to get quite competitive and almost forgot that there were creating quite long and complex German sentences in the past tense; something that causes headaches for quite a few pupils!  They were even going around ‘borrowing’ bricks off each other to make their towers taller!

The atmosphere was, although competitive, quite serene; you could almost hear the quite buzzing of busy brain cells.  At the end of the activity, I took photos.  The pupils were so proud of their towers that they asked me to wait until they had run out of bricks!  On this occasion there was no prize.  They were simply happy to have the glory of creating the tallest tower in the class, and in doing so, creating fantastic, complex past tense sentences.

I learnt that you’ve sometimes just got to go with it; take a risk and wait to see what happens.  Also, I learnt that you should keep your eyes peeled for cheap children’s toys; I’ve got quite a collection now!

Original tweet here

German word towers

German word towers

Using Discussion Trees
IMG_0796

Last Friday I posted a #pedagoofriday comment about how pleased I was with my bottom set work on discussion trees. This is a simple method I use to help students consider the strengths and weaknesses of any statement. in RE the discussion of such statements counts for a significant number of marks and so is an important skill for us to work on.

On the desk the students blue tack a prepared picture of a tree that then has a statement printed on the tree trunk. On Friday the statement was “It is reasonable to believe that God does miracles”

Without any ‘fresh’ input from the teacher the students consider points to support the statement  - these are represented as roots for the tree, and challenges to the statement – these are represented as gusts of wind.

In the photos below you can see one table group creating a desk full of challenges, as well as a group who are just beginning the process.

IMG_0790 IMG_0796

An important part of the process is getting the students to represent the strength of each argument through the size of the root or gust of the wind. This evaluation of each argument should be achieved as they engage in discussion in their table teams.

I then extend the task by introducing some philosophical arguments. In this case it included arguments from Hume, Swinburne, Aquinas and Wiles, plus a little info on quantum physics. The students decide whether what they are reading is root or wind, they summarise key points and write down accordingly.

The final part of the task is for the students to then discuss and agree on the final state of the tree. They indicate this by using a ruler and drawing a line to indicate if the tree remains vertical, or blown at a greater angle. They may even suggest it has in fact been felled. Obviously they are considering whether the arguments against the statement are more effective than the arguments for the statement, and most importantly, to what extent this is the case.

I then photograph their group work. The following lesson students get a copy of their group work for their own books but also to use as they provide an exam response to the discussion statement that they have worked on.

This approach works well with the whole range of abilities and can be modified based on the material you give each group to work with.

by @lorraineabbott7

See more on my blog at https://lorraineabbott.wordpress.com

Teacher Well-being Bags
BAG 1

After an overwhelming response to the teacher well-being bags created this week on #PedagooFriday, I decided to blog about them here on Pedagoo.

Many people have asked me where I got the idea from, so I think that’s a good a place to start as any.

The past few weeks have seen teachers blogging about their reflections on 2014 and hopes for 2015 using the #nurture1415 tag created by @ChocoTzar. Thanks to @sue_cowley who kindly collated them and you can find the full list of this year’s offerings here. These inspiring blogs are accompanied by @ICTEvangelist’s amazing posters. See here for those.

In addition, a growing number of teachers have also been blogging about their #teacher5aday resolutions, an exciting initiative designed to promote well-being belonging to @MartynReah For an explanation by the man himself, see here. A collection of #teacher5aday blogs can also be found here.

T5ADY

(Original image taken by @MissEtchells)

After reading many of the blogs from the list above it got me thinking about what I could do to improve well-being in my own place of work. It seems obvious and simple to me that if teachers are healthy, positive individuals their teaching practice benefits from this. In the current climate surrounding education teachers need to know that there are people who care about their well-being and that they really do matter. Teacher well-being bags were the outcome of a late night planning session designed to get this message delivered.

My role within the school is to improve teaching and learning. That means working closely with colleagues. It’s important to me that staff want to improve because they want to improve, not because I want them to. To achieve this I organised an in-house TeachMeet focusing on expertise from within the school. The aim was to make staff feel valued and encourage a collaborative approach to teaching and learning across the curriculum areas. This was to take place on our inset day after the Christmas break. Having asked staff to step out of their comfort zones, I was conscious that after two weeks away nerves would have set in. In an attempt to make staff feel welcome and confident I distributed the bags. They were an immediate hit!

Each bag contained a personalised poster created quickly and easily using @RhonnaFarrer’s design app.

WELL BEING

The rest of the items included are listed below along with instructions for use:

  • Cupcake cook book – set up a rota and get baking for department meetings
  • Star stickies – write praise on these and leave them in places your colleagues will find them
  • Stickers – label lessons/ideas that worked well
  • Notepad – write down great teaching ideas on the go!
  • Stickies – use these in department meetings to plan new schemes/lessons. Time-savers.
  • Mints – to keep you cool when the going gets tough
  • Biscuits – for duty days and break times
  • Highlighters – to make your schemes of work stand out
  • Tissues – for those days. We all have them.
  • Sweets – an energy boost for those afternoon triple lessons
  • Stamps – we all love stamps, right?

The list is by no means exhaustive and was, if I’m honest, a little rushed. I plan on improving the concept this term.  I’m already thinking about ‘revision packs’ for my year 11s!

Initial feedback from the bags has been fantastic. One staff member said she, ‘felt the room visibly lift,’  when they were distributed, whilst another stated, ‘it made me feel part of a team.’ I shall continue to measure impact over the next term but it’s already quite clear due to the response from staff and Twitter users that it’s a welcome idea.

I hope you’ve found them, and this blog, useful!

Why not have a go at your own #nurture1415 or #teacher5aday?

Abbie

Pedagoo Christmas Party – Questioning
December 22, 2014
0
B24XJHTIQAAjCPV

Welcome to the long awaited overview of the Pedagoo Christmas Party Questioning session.  I was fortunate enough to be facilitating a fabulously creative and thoughtful group of pedadogical paragons meaning that other than taking notes I was able to sit back and enjoy these marvellous people sharing things which made their classrooms special.  This blog is intended to provide an overview of ideas presented and links to other resources that were shared and discussed rather than creating a dilution of the ideas myself.  Each of the ideas shared is worthy of a blog in its own right, so if there is not a link and you’ve been working on something similar why not share it on @pedagoo?

Carol Stobbs

Carol shared a few interesting ideas with us;

She discussed the importance of having factual knowledge to be able to question deeply and enable powerful thinking and the challenges that this creates.  We need to have the foundations of knowledge before we can build deeper understanding and higher order thinking.

Next Carol shared something she liked from John Sayers blog on Questioning Grids which can be found here: http://sayersjohn.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/questioning.html ; John has a fabulous blog and I personally recommend it also.

Carol also shared her own fabulous Good Cop/Bad Cop analysis tool she uses to look at sources in history, “are they positive/negative?”, “how are they useful?”, “what are the limitations?” Carol’s Blog can on this can be found here: http://littlestobbsy.wordpress.com/2014/12/08/good-copbad-cop-source-analysis/

Jo McShane

Jo shared the importance of MLG, Marginal Learning Gains for both teachers and students.  Passionately and honestly sharing how she has been looking to improve both her own questioning and that of her students using this philosophy.  More on MLG can be found on Zoe Elders blog here: http://fullonlearning.com/marginal-learning-gains-blog/

Peter Thomas

Peter was kind enough to share three big ideas on questioing he has been working on in his school.

1) Art Gallery critique; students go around looking at each other work leaving comments and questions.  It’s a great method as it leads to surprisingly challenging questions being generated for students and it creates a lot of individualised challenge based on reponses to their own work.

2) Students exploring how to respond to specific types of questions.  Looking at exam papers and decoding them to understand exactly what is being asked of them.  They even created their own systems and acronyms to support them in their approaches to exam questions.  It was great to hear of the success this student owned exercise (supported of course) has had.

3) Using Iris (a video observation platform) to focus on questions.  It’s one thing to have a tally of question types, another to see them written down.  To watch yourself asking questions and the responses to them really focuses the mind to improve.

Here is a link to Peter’s article relating to this on his schools CPD Blog: https://educatingchurchill.wordpress.com/2014/07/18/how-do-we-evaluate-the-impact-of-cpd/

Kirsty Davies-Walters

Plicker; Kirsty shared with us a method of quickly testing starting knowledge and understanding of key concepts using an app called Plicker.  Students hold up a code, based on multiple choice answers and the teacher scans the room with an iPad to get instant data on student comprehension.  It only works well with closed questions which have specific multiple choice answers, but as a tool I was surprised by its efficiency. If you want to instantly assess knowledge it is a great app.

Caroline Collings

Caroline shared using SOLO Taxonomy as a way to target the thinking of students.  She recommended having questioins set to the different levels of the SOLO Taxonomy and students directing their level of challenge.  She has found that students who aim low quickly progress to the correct level of challenge as they advance and those who pick too high normally readjust their challenge to build on their knowledge and thinking.

There’s loads of SOLO Taxonomy ideas on the @pedagoo website but I’d recommend starting here if you’d like to know more http://www.pedagoo.org/a-solo-experiment/

Kylie Bannister

Kylie shared how she had been using different coloured lollypop sticks as part of her no hands up questioning.  Using different levels/styles of question depending on the colour coding of the sticks.  This meant that she could either target a person to the question when “randomly selecting” who would be answering after giving them thinking time.

Secondly she shared how she had used a “boat race” where students moved markers accross the table during her small A-Level group of reluctant speakers each time they shared a worthwhile response.  She found that this simple technique had generated a positive response to engaging with verbal responses in her group.

Karenza Passmore

Karenza shared some thoughts on when closed questions can be valuable, how they can be done well and how they are still fit for their purpose. It just depends what the purpose of your questions are.  These were some ideas she found on @atharby blog which can be found here: http://reflectingenglish.wordpress.com/2014/11/09/closed-question-quizzing-unfashionable-yet-effective/

Finally my talk on questioning at the party can be found here http://www.pedagoo.org/audio-from-pedagooxmas/ and my notes from the presentation can be found here http://ikonoklaste.wordpress.com/2014/12/06/whats-the-big-idea/comment-page-1/

Hope you find some of the links useful and have a Sharing Christmas and a Pedagogical New Year.

Barry Dunn – @SeahamRE

Licensed to Create
November 30, 2014
0
image

This is a must watch for all Pedagooey teachers! Find out more here: thersa.org/teachers

The Earth is Flat and Kissing Makes You Pregnant
November 29, 2014
0
Flat Earth

When Hamlet says that “there is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so” he isn’t too wide of the mark. We can think ourselves into all sorts of nonsense if we work hard enough. There are still Flat Earthers, people who think global warming is a myth, and that JFK was killed by the CIA (well, actually the jury may be out on that one…). Some people in my profession – teachers and parents – see the internet as a similarly polarising issue.  On the one hand we have the advocates who argue that the internet has democratised access to knowledge and information and has fundamentally revolutionised the role of the teacher. On the other hand we have the opponents who see the internet as an unregulated hotbed of disinformation that undermines the pivotal role of the teacher as guardian of learning. Just to be clear, and in a spirit of full disclosure, I fall into the first of these two positions, and I would like to say why.

Good schools (and good teachers) are in the futures business.

Schools do not produce stuff for the here and now. Our job is to help build the future, one learner at the time. What we do now should be as relevant as we can make it, but the gauge of what is relevant must be defined by what learners will need for the future, not what they used to need in the past.

Good schools (and good teachers) genuinely put learners first.

Today’s young people live in a world that is saturated with technology – and it is developing at an ever-increasing rate. We all have a duty to make sure that today’s learners grow up as adept, skilful, discriminating and ethical in their use of the tools available to us. That means each and every teacher has that self-same duty. It cannot be outsourced to Tech Support. It isn’t somebody else’s job. Simply put, if you do not help young people to develop their use of technology for learning in your classroom then you are not putting their needs ahead of your own. Likewise schools that do not find ways to invest in technology cannot be said to be genuinely meeting the needs of learners in the 21st century.

Good schools (and good teachers) are excited, entrepreneurial learners.

There is not a teacher preparation system in the world that has prepared teachers for the world in which we now live. Back in 1987 when I qualified as a teacher, nobody knew what was coming. Only the occasional wild-eyed futurist could have foreseen the revolution that Web 2.0 would bring. But now it is here and we need to deal with it. The way in which we do this says a lot about our preparedness to be part of the revolution. If we take the path of suspicion, mistrust and denial, deluding ourselves that we are “holding on to traditional best practice” (sic), then our profession has a problem. We each need to adopt an entrepreneurial mindset committed to taking personal responsibility for our own learning. We need to embrace our professional duty to be problem-solvers and inquirers. People who wait around to be “upskilled” will not only miss the boat but they will undermine the learning needs of each and every student they share time with

Good schools (and good teachers) identify and hold on to fundamental principles.

In a world where change is a constant it has never been more important to identify and hold on to the fundamental principles upon which we believe schools are based: schools put student learning first; effective teaching is a thoughtful, planned activity; intellectual rigour isn’t a passing fad; and skills and values trump content every single time (but it is a fallacy to think it is one or the other).

Finally, good schools (and good teachers) practice what they preach.

If we want our young people to grow up as creative, knowledgeable, skilful, ethical, technologically adept inquirers then we have to have those self-same expectations of ourselves and each other. And that is a big ask. In education we face probably one of the biggest challenges any profession has ever faced: reinvention.

If you are reading this as a teacher or an administrator in schools, which side of the divide do you fall on? And before you start to prevaricate, there really are only two sides: you can’t be a little bit pregnant. Then again, you can’t get pregnant by kissing either, but is doesn’t stop some people thinking you can, or that the earth is flat, or that global warming is a myth, or that JFK was killed by…