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Credit where credit is due on #PedagooFriday

You’re probably aware of our end-of-the-week hashtag #PedagooFriday.  The idea is to create a space on Twitter where teachers can share a positive experience from their classroom and, perhaps, develop a happier tone at the end of the week.  It’s been quite a week.  Nuff said.

As this week’s Duty Moderator, I noticed that several tweachers posting links to blogs about their practice in their #PedagooFriday tweets and I’ve taken the liberty of producing a summary here.

If you’re interested in tech, you’ll be interested in @stirdigilearn’s post. The EduTechScot2017 conference took place in Glasgow and the event focused on STEM learning through digital technology and how it can be harnessed by educators to equip themselves and children with the tools to succeed. Sounds interesting, right? See the Stirling Digital Learning blog post for a concise review of some of the cool resources encountered at the event. See the #EduTechScot hashtag on Twitter for even more information about the conference.

Tech in the form of visualisers seemed to be flavour of the week, appearing in posts from two teachers at schools in different parts of the UK.

Firstly, @MrMarsham tagged a post on @BedfordAcademy’s ‘Teaching and Learning Showcase’ blog which contains a collection of shared teaching and learning ideas contributed by staff from Bedford Academy in Milton Keynes.  In his post ‘My best friend, the visualiser’ Dave Marsham explains how he makes use of this piece of tech to model and to give feedback on answers in Maths and History lessons.

Secondly, @mrsjmasters tagged a tweet from @HuntResearchSch about a post by Dr Susan Smith, Science TA at Huntingdon School and Biology Tutor at York College.

Huntingdon School is one of Education Endowment Foundation’s (EEF) Research Schools Network.  Work funded in schools by EEF claims that metacognition and one-to-one teaching are cost effective, high impact means of raising attainment.  A focus group recently held at Huntingdon School tried to define metacognition and what it looks like in practice. It became clear that teachers wanted examples of what metacognition means in practice. In her post called ‘Becoming a (Metacognitive) Teacher Part 1’ Susan outlines how she uses visualisers in combination with a virtual learning environment (VLE) with her students. Part 2 is also available on the school blog.

A piece of practice-based enquiry was referenced in a tweet from @TeacherBS14, twitter handle for the web page for teaching and learning at St. Bernadette Catholic Secondary School in Bristol.  In this case, the blog post outlined an action research project into scaffolding and differentiation in Art with Year 8, Year 9 and SEND nurture students undertaken by Art teacher Teresa Hove.  This is Teresa’s first year in the secondary sector after a move from primary.

Last, but by no means least, our very dear friend and inventor of the #PedagooFriday hashtag @kennypieper  published ‘What’s Grown Ups Going to Think?’.  Here Kenny eloquently explains why social media should be welcoming space for all teachers.  Hear, hear Kenny!

In terms of this particular collaborative blog, if it’s about your teaching practice, we’d like to help share it.  You can cross post.  Yes, we’re more than happy to accept posts that appear on other blogs. Otherwise, you can write something just for us. There’s certainly a big Pedagoo audience out there, with currently over 32 thousand followers on social media.

It’s good to share, and it’s the entire raison d’être of the Pedagoo community. Come blog with us! http://www.pedagoo.org/newpost/

Something out of nothing

I am often bowled over by an EYFS teacher’s ability to create something out of nothing. When so much in Early Years revolves around child interest, it can often be difficult to plan for the interests of all children. And even if you do it can be in vain, when a group of children totally into superheroes for example, completely reject the phenomenal new area of provision you have slaved over.

A rainy day outdoors last week with no cover and soggy resources led to a frustrated teacher, thinking, as ever, quite literally on her wet feet. The children showed a real interest in jumping in the puddles. Yay! Physical development. Good job as everything else was a tad limited.

The impacting teacher joins in, has fun, talks about the puddles, the weather, asks key questions. The innovating teacher sees something else. They think at a zillion miles an hour how they can extend this learning to something really rather special. The children started to jump from the puddles into a now dry tuff spot. Cue footprints! The innovating teacher will quell the instinct to yell “STOP! SLIPPERY!”. The teacher helped the children, with the use of Building Learning Power, to notice. What could they see in the footprints? There were stripes, zig zags, circles – patterns! We have maths! Woohoo!

Brain spirals again. Grab chalks! Go over the patterns with your chalk. Literacy! More physical development! The children give meaning to their marks. But now the tuff spot is also a wet mess with no visible footprints. The group head over to a ready set up mark making area outdoors under cover where there is an abundance of thick paper. The children jump up and down on the paper, repeating the process of retracing lines. “Can I take it home to show Mummy?” – PSED! They are proud.

The innovating teacher has, naturally, captured all this on her iPad. Assessment!

The opportunities to extend beyond this are ten fold. Learning walks looking for patterns, printing using other tools, sensory activities.

Its great to have a fabulous environment. But on occasion even that can let you down. And it is at that point that the innovating EYFS teacher has the ability to literally create something out of nothing. Which very often leads to the best learning outcomes!

Using stories to support numeracy – Collette Collects – a picture book for number bonds…

It is always good to have a bit of a project for the school holidays. My October holiday project probably should have been having a big tidy-up or finding someone to clean the guttering, but instead I decided to finish writing and illustrating a picture book.

This was quite a significant project as I am not a writer and I have only just started learning to draw but I have been writing this book, through various iterations, over the past 6 months in response to a need I identified while teaching.

As we all know, learning your number bonds is a really helpful stepping stone toward improving your mental maths. If you know what numbers go together to make 10 then you can immediately access a whole load of other number facts.

If you know without a moments hesitation that 7 + 3 = 10 then you can quickly see that 70 + 30 = 100 and

700 + 300 = 100 and

13+7 = 20 and

53 + 7 = 60 and so on…

However, for some kids, retaining these number facts is much harder than it is for others. Having tried to teach these facts every which way I could think of, some kids were still struggling, but I knew that some of those same children could tell me every detail of a story I had told them.

So I decided to try writing these facts into a story.

The book is called Collette Collects and it is about a wee girl who likes to make collections of things. She doesn’t really mind what she collects but she feels that for a collection to really be a collection it should have 10 things.

Last session I started to read (various versions of) this story every week before our regular mental maths activity and after a few weeks some of those children who had always struggled were shouting out the answers to the questions posed on every page and I started to see a slow but steady improvement in their number bond knowledge.

I have now created a complete, illustrated version and I am working with a group of class teachers in different settings and parents of children aged approx. 5 – 7 years to test and measure the impact of the book.

If you would like to use a copy in your school the book is available from both TES Resources and Teachers Pay Teachers. If you would be interested in taking part in the testing process, please contact me via twitter @MrsJTeaches or use the contact form below.

[contact-form to=’MrsJDraws@gmail.com’ subject=’Pedagoo Post’][contact-field label=’Name’ type=’name’ required=’1’/][contact-field label=’Email’ type=’email’ required=’1’/][contact-field label=’Website’ type=’url’/][contact-field label=’Comment’ type=’textarea’ required=’1’/][/contact-form]

 

 

Blendspace

As one of our digital leaders at school, responsible for raising our digital prowess and use of technology to enhance learning (rather than just a bolt on), I am often asked what are my most recommended apps/tools to use in the classroom. I am by no means an expert – in fact, quite late to the technological game when it comes to it being integrated into the classroom. I have learnt a great deal from experts in the field, such as Mr P ICT and Rob Smith (founder of Literacy Shed). As an avid fan of all things technological, I spend my CPD time learning from them and gleaning whatever I can from the trail they, and others, have carved out. So, with all that in mind, I apologise now if anything I share might be ‘old news’ for you.

My favourite at the moment is ‘Blendspace’, which does exactly as it says on the tin – blend the ‘digital’ space with that of your classroom. I have found this tool invaluable with any children I teach (KS1 – KS2). It allows me to create a digital pinboard, for the children to access online content that I have chosen and selected beforehand. I have used QR codes for a while (another post to come) to allow children to quickly access a website, without having to enter in the inordinately long address. When I have needed them to access multiple websites, I have given them multiple QR codes, which in its essence, is fine. Except there is something better. Blendspace.

You can access this website (soon to be an app also, I hear) through your TES account. If you don’t have one of those….you’d be the first teacher I’ve met who doesn’t. Go get one! It’s free and is a whole remarkable resource all of its own. I don’t have time to unpack the genius of this place here and now. Alternatively, you can just sign up for Blendspace.

Blendspace allows me to compile any digital content that I want in one central place for the children to access. I can upload directly from TES, Google, Youtube, images….etc.

Here is a screen grab of a lesson I delivered a few weeks back to Year 6 on Charles Darwin. I wanted them to research, using the questions they had generated. By ‘googling’ Charles Darwin, they would have spent too much time sifting through to find relevant KS2 appropriate information. Here, I provided it for them.

Untitled

Here you can see that I found a PDF, links to websites and a video, through the search function on the right. I then just clicked and dragged into the available boxes on the left. Here, all the research resources they need are in one location. Now, for them to access this ‘digital lesson’ I have done one of two things. Either:

1 – Used the link above as a hyperlink on our class blog. I tend to do this if I want them to access this outside of school.

2 – Clicked on the green ‘share’ button at the top and then copied and pasted the QR code onto a document. I usually display this on the board, or print off for tables. All our children have access to ipads and so can scan the QR code, which will take them to what you can see above.

Saying that – it isn’t the longer address and they could type it into the address bar. Not my first choice, but not a problem either.

Once created, I named my lesson and it became forever in my library of lessons. Others can access it too, if they search for ‘Charles Darwin’. On that note, if you click on ‘blendspace’ at the top, it will take you back to your dashboard – your homepage, if you will. From here, you can search for lessons that already exist, that others have made. Super useful.

You could differentiate the ‘lesson’ by creating a different pinboard for each group. I have also used it in a carousel activity, when I needed multiple stations, each with different research. My students have also used this to create ‘lessons’ on a topic they researched for Home Learning, to make the websites/resources they used available to all. After we have finished, the QR codes are added to the display board, for anyone to continue to research in their own time. A number do.

I was using this before we purchased iPads. Whilst I believe they do make it smoother, they are not essential to using this excellent tool.

I used this weekly in some capacity or another, in a range of lessons throughout the curriculum. Sometimes, it has just been set up as a station for those who are ready for challenge/early morning work, with websites to SPAG revision, phonics games etc. We have even used it to upload the children’s actual work, be it writing, calculations or art work, so that it can be seen by others (parents, children, teacher) all in one place – a gallery of learning.

If you are already using it, I would love to hear about other ways you have used it, whatever your setting. If you haven’t, please let me know if you started using it and what you thought of it. My staff were really excited to discover this and have found it invaluable already. I hope it is for you too.  Happy blending!

Wordscapes for assessment
December 4, 2015
1

I use these wordscape designs to assess understanding of key words. The children record their key words and phrases inside the template (that can be linked to the specific theme). They are then able to discuss and build upon prior knowledge to develop their understanding and make links to other learning whilst completing their wordscapes. I normally ask the children to complete these over one session to show what they can recap quickly and efficiently.

These wordscapes are also great for a bright, decorative and informative piece of learning for theme books or working walls.

This concept can be used in Maths too, as the children could record calculations to show their understanding of number bonds to 1000, for example.

The vocabulary slips that are used are designed by @pw2tweets and these are a fast and efficient for children to record key words at the start of the session, before they begin their wordscapes.

The Elephant in the Classroom #FabEduBooks

My favourite edubook is The Elephant in the Classroom by Jo Boaler. In the book Boaler talks about the mathematical progress of thousands of students from the UK and USA whom she followed over a number of years from school into their adult life. She also gives some great suggestions of ways in which maths can be taught better in schools.

I remember being skeptical as I didn’t want to read a book which gave you lots of data about what was working in schools and what wasn’t: I didn’t want to read a textbook. However, The Elephant in the Classroom managed to give you the information needed to understand the theory and ways to put this into practice whilst being captivating and informative. I had the book finished within a few days and I read it again this time annotating parts and taking notes for things I wanted to do in the classroom.

Back in 2010 two chapters stood out for me. In “A vision for a better future” Boaler sets out two different ways we can make maths more engaging and meaningful for pupils: a project based approach and a communicative one. As someone who had just finished a PGDE where the approach was to introduce the topic, explain the rules and have students practice them multiple times, I was intrigued to try out something different.

The other chapter was “Making ‘low ability’ children” which in no uncertain terms told me the system “tell(s) children from a very young age, that they are no good at maths”. I was shocked by the bluntness but after thinking about how we ‘set’ pupils from S1 by ability I couldn’t disagree. This started a love/hate relationship with me around setting – something I still think about.

Having picked up the book again to write this post I rediscovered another chapter which I’m going to re-read: “Paying the price for sugar and spice: how girls and women are kept out of maths and science”. I’ve recently spent a bit of time researching the social constructs of gender and how we use these in schools as ways to control behaviour and sort young people into groups. I’m interested to find out what Boaler said…back soon *opens chapter*


#FabEduBooks is supported by Crown House Publishing

Everyone who shares a post on their favourite edubook this September on Pedagoo.org will be entered into a draw at the start of October. The lucky winner will receive a Big Bag of Books from Crown House Publishing.

To find out how to submit your post, click on the following link: Pedagoo.org/newpost

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Area and Perimeter – Helpful resources

Kids struggle with this topic.  They find the area by adding all the sides and multiply to find the perimeter… Or worse they add then multiply in a complex calculation!  Now I’m not saying i’ve cracked it using the resource below my kids have spent the week wrestling with challenging questions that has had them deeply engaged and discussing the two to an extent that I hope will mean long term gain.

2015-06-05 16.29.14

Blank 100 grid game

I’m finding more and more uses for a blank 100 number grid and this wee game is fast becoming my S1’s favourite.  In pairs, pupils are given a blank 100 grid, two different coloured pencils and two dice.  They take turns to roll and what ever numbers they are given they have to draw a rectangle with those dimensions on the grid e.g. if they roll a 4 and a 3 they’d draw a four by three (or three by four) rectangle. Play until grid is complete – winner has most squares coloured in or for a twist – whoever draws the last rectangle.

What do the pupils learn from this?

  • Simple motor skills of using a ruler
  • Simple counting – it’s amazing how the really poor kids will draw a five by three instead of four by three because they don’t count the first box as “it belongs to the three boxes”
  • Timestables – kinesthetic practice of 4 x 3 etc.
  • Strategy – where to put the rectangles on the grids
  • Probability – some numbers come up more than others – so they say – investigations to be pursued!
  • Area of a rectangle – by default and without mentioning it for the first few weeks of playing the game… Bonus!!!

Extensions I have been mulling over and will look to introduce this week are:

  • Add the numbers instead of multiply to give area and pupils will have to decide the rectangle dimensions
  • Use of half squares
  • Don’t need to draw rectangles
  • The number from the dice (added or multiplied) has to be the perimeter

Here is a blank 100 grid sheet if you fancy giving this a go.

 

NRich Worksheet

With all the kids practice of area of a rectangle within the game it seemed appropriate not to get them doing a simple textbook exercise so I had a look on my hard drive and found this beauty of a worksheet:

NRich Website – Area and Perimeter

The kids worked in pairs trying to come up with rectangles and other shapes which would meet the criteria asked of them which resulted in far more practice of area and perimeter calculations than would’ve been carried out if they were doing a straightforward ‘find the area/perimeter’ type worksheet/exercise. More than that though; my kids showed great resilience and the ‘have-a-go’ attitude that I’ve been wanting to see for months!

They drew lots of shapes and started to think about half squares (I could’ve jumped on this, went off on a tangent and talked about Pythagoras’ Theorem but instead I just told them the length of diagonal was 1.4 and built the suspense of “we’ll learn how to work this out for ourselves next year”) and some kids got very creative with their shapes e.g. one pupil drew a robot where squares were removed from rectangle head to make area less without effecting perimeter.

They might not have twigged onto logical processes that some of their peers in higher sets would have; they were mostly using blind luck and trial and error but they were thinking about what they were doing and noticing some patterns and that’s all I ever want from my kids 🙂

All in all, they’ll probably still get mixed up between working out area and perimeter but they’ve had more practice using these two resources with not a bored sigh heard all week.  I’m calling that a success.

Class Economy
Image by flickr.com/photos/68751915@N05

We recently had a finance week at our school and in Primary 6 focussed on bank accounts and budgets.  This seemed like a good time to start Class Economy with my class.  Class Economy, is an idea that a colleague gave to me a few years ago and I’m sure many other teachers around Scotland and the world have used.  In our version, learners are given bank books and each week are ‘paid’ wages, bonuses for class jobs and gain interest on savings.  They also have to pay tax, hire their seat and pay fines for late homework and other infringements of class rules.  The children check each other’s calculations and sign off on them and roughly once a fortnight the class bank opens (run by them) and they can withdraw cash.  In our version, we also have a class shop where they can buy things small items like pencils.  This year when I told the children about the project, I also told them about previous businesses other classes had run.  They blew me away with how quickly they responded to this.  So far they have opened 3 hire businesses, an art shop, one shop and a face painting pop up for Halloween and I was presented with my first contract for a business who want to buy and sublet seats.  What strikes me most though is the excitement that can build up and the issues they have to deal with.  Some of them are saving and aiming to invest.  Some are starting to think about how to stop other people just pinching their best ideas.  They are already grappling with questions like: Should everyone in the business get the same share? How do they make their idea unique?  How do they promote their business?

Last year, one of the learners in my previous class, ran an event where he auctioned seats for a raffle and the excitement was tangible.  Some people were buying seats for huge prices, others waiting for cheaper seats, others still wondering what exactly people were paying for.  When I asked the learner, “what exactly are they paying for?”  His reply was, “it’s all about creating a buzz.”  He then ran a very successful event but had to deal with keeping staff on side and the reactions of others to his success (with help).

Play is often a great way to explore and learn.  I am new to this blog and am looking forward to exploring other ideas and approaches that people are using.

A New Approach for those in Danger of Failure?

As a teacher, how does this grab you as a challenge? You are to be part of a team working with 30 pupils from the south side of Glasgow? They are identified as being at risk of disengagement, but with the potential to become successful apprentices and good citizens. You must remain true to the principles of Curriculum for Excellence. What might be different for you is that your organisation is ready to wipe the slate with your experience in the classroom. You are going to look at the pedagogies of what works and use them in your practice every day – with only three other colleagues.

“Three?” I hear you ask. Correct. The curriculum will be delivered by four teachers – Science, IT, Maths and English, but also by partner organisations, made up of the private businesses who are not only investing in the venture, but who are guaranteeing apprenticeships to those young people who complete the course and FE colleges which are guaranteeing places for the NJC leavers.

This is the plan for Newlands Junior College, the brainchild of Jim McColl, Scottish entrepreneur. His vision is to take young people who are heading for failure and give them a real prospect of success.

Scotland’s schools are very good. I don’t think that’s in question here. But there is – and always has been – a group of young people who just don’t get a good deal. They are not academically driven, have perhaps a challenging background or a family whose experience of education is entirely negative, but who nonetheless have some kind of talent or ability. They are not heading for university, but exist in a system which is designed to make them feel that the only achievement that really counts is getting in to university. Yet business is crying out for people with good practical skills and the right attitude to work.

These are exactly the people that McColl’s Newlands Junior College appears to be designed to cater for. If only they could be prevented from disengaging, as they often do.

The college has started to engage staff.  They will be working in a very special environment, with the best technology and with unrivalled opportunities to develop their pedagogical skills.

Iain White, Principal of the College and former Head Teacher of Govan High, which serves one of the most deprived areas of Scotland, makes no secret of the formula “This will be an organisation built on relationships – there will be no room for messing around, but we intend to be like a family, where – like every family – we will have our moments, but we are all here for the same reason. We will all be motivated towards what we want to achieve together. That togetherness will be based on mutual respect and a mutual understanding of what we are here for.”

And for the young people who, through the selection process, get a place, that achievement will be quite something. With resources available to equip every pupil with a handheld computer, cutting edge IT provision and links with future employers who will not only provide curriculum input, but mentoring relationships and guidance, the prospects for these otherwise potentially-failing pupils are suddenly looking dramatically brighter.

Of course schools try very hard to prevent young people dropping out. But Newlands will have some crucial advantages. It will be able to guarantee the outcomes (apprenticeships and college places for every successful leaver) . Also, it is not school. Whatever Hollywood tells us about inspirational teachers and innovative and ground-breaking approaches to learning, sometimes the problem is simply that school is the wrong place for disenchanted teenagers. Newlands Junior College, based in real place of work, with its top quality adult environment is clearly not a school. So many things are different from the quality of design to the close involvement of students in everything including the preparation of meals. At Newlands, they not only know what works, but (more importantly) for these students they know what doesn’t.

An education for the 21st century has to very different from the classroom of the past. It has to be suited to each individual in a way that is unique and inspiring. It has to connect to adult life and the real world in ways that every student can understand. Every day, every student has to feel valued and believe in the possibility of success.

I look forward to schools and indeed, colleges, of all descriptions providing a wide and varied menu of education, utilising top technology, demanding top professionals and producing top quality graduates upon whom employers can rely, as they have had an input to their education and training. The destinations are guaranteed – not as some kind of social responsibility policy – but as a real engagement between young people, their parents, teachers, employers and trainers. I look forward to more initiatives like this and not only that, but I look forward to them being supported as complementary to the current school system.

Newlands Junior College is still looking for a Science teacher and a Maths teacher, so if you think you might enjoy this kind of opportunity, check out the website and application form here.

Still twittering but what changes? 3 years on.
Image by flickr.com/photos/mkhmarketing

Twittering in the classroom, that was a long time ago.

The cohort that I wrote that blog about left school last week. They were just starting S4 at the time.

It has been a fair fast flowing few years and we have seen social media grow over that time.

Am I going to be annihilated by the bosses for using twitter? Well no, I wasn’t.

Still, some colleagues gently patted me on the head, smiled and said something along the lines of “The GTCs would fry us!”

So I contacted the GTCs and got a very supportive response. Essentially telling me I am not going to be in trouble with the GTCs, so long as my bosses are ok with it.

The framework we were using was approved and, these years on, I think we are safely using twitter appropriately.

How has it developed?

Now, several parents follow the feed

This is a very important, if unexpected, development. Some children tell me they are not permitted to use social media. By using this life skill in our work, parents are letting go a little but also following themselves. The fact we can help pupils understand when they make a mistake and tweet something poorly thought out.

In fact, in that time, I have had two pupils make comments that were a bit “off” but nothing major. For most people, Social Media is rather self-regulating.

We link with local community

So, imagine when the local MP or councillors tweet a link or comment about Pay Day loans. My local MP, whose office is right across from the school, is Fiona O’Donnell who is a big campaigner. The numbers are interesting, the links to poverty and to modern studies etc.

This lets us get that message out to the kids. Maths is awesome (stop singing that song!)

I also follow the local sports teams of every sport, it gives me a heads up when a pupil gets a gold medal in a swimming contest or similar. I can’t rely on the kids telling me (they ARE teenagers after all) but they do love getting praised, so long as thy can whinge about it too.

Banter is good

Banter, or “Bant’r” with a strong east coast accent. This is important for teenagers. We don’t instigate Banter with kids, but we do with other departments. When the English department tweeted a photo of the debating team standing in the Disney store with kermit and Miss Piggy. It was my DUTY to tweet “who is the muppet on the right?” And yes it was a DHT and no I didn’t get sacked. Maths and English having a laugh together. Suddenly pupils see the maths and English department are not great enemies. This stuff matters to some kids.

24/7 support when it is needed

That is not a by-product of the experiment. It is the reason for being.
Pupils don’t panic about my homework, they don’t worry about what day a test is one. And as three teachers now use the same account, I no longer have to answer all the queries by myself, and I also get to help kids I don’t know. It is like a Quality Assurance exercise, and it helps children.

A little nuclear weapon in parental discussions.

“I have had to get a tutor as he struggles with his maths homework”
“He knows he can tweet me any time for help. Take a photo of the page and…”

“Wait ’till I get home and see him!”

Every department has it now

Culture has changed. The pedagoo power of positivity became a critical mass. No longer am I the geeky one (I never was geeky, mind!)
Some people were afraid I was letting kids use their phones in class. This was not true, because it was against the school rules. If I wanted people to trust me, I had to use their familiar boundaries in general. Once they realised I was not against the grain, really, people joined in.
Now we really have feeds for parents from the main school account and kids can “tune in” to what ever school feeds they feel helpful. No point in getting chemistry feeds if you don’t study it or find it interesting.
PE, Sport, RE, Maths, English, Chemistry, Physics, the list just kept growing. That is fab.

Keeping up foreign relations.

I don’t mean the other side of the world, but other maths departments locally. Most teachers don’t see the council boundary lines as reasons to avoid talking either so tweets to and from maths departments in the region and beyond just enrich the learning experience. It also builds up resources and links. “See how you tweeted that you had just finished a Nat 4 homework book….”

Just interesting to see how it all changed.

And now from being the hunter, to being the hunted. This is the first pedagoo post that I have had to await approval of. #pedagooAdmin (RTD)

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