Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in comments
Search in excerpt
Search in posts
Search in pages
Search in groups
Search in users
Search in forums
Filter by Categories
#ScotEdChat
Admin
Art
Assessment
Book
Creativity
Curricular Areas
Curriculum
Differentiation
dyslexia
edubooks
English
Expressive Arts
gtcspl
History
ICT
Ideas
Implementation
Inclusion
Involving Pupils
Leadership
Literacy
mag
Maths
Modern Languages
Numeracy
Outdoor Learning
PE
Pedagoo
Pedagoo@PL
PedagooEvents
PedagooFriday
PedagooGlasgow
PedagooLocal
PedagooLondon
PedagooPeebles
PedagooReflect
PedagooResolutions
PedagooSunshine
Plenary
Primary
Professional Learning
Qualification
Research
Resource
Resource
Science
Scottish Learning Fringe
Skills
SLFringe
Social Studies
SOLO
TeachMeets
Technologies
tmlovelibraries
Uncategorized
Visible Learning
xmasparty
Learning by Mistake


Learning by Mistake

Over the last few months I’ve become enthused by Carol Dweck’s work on the concept of a growth mindset. As a result of this I decided that it was time to make much better use of students’ learning mistakes in my classroom. Typically most students tend to not want to dwell on mistakes they’ve made, as they don’t want to be reminded of what they and others perceive as failure.

B66_-NeCcAAQ5mS

My Best Learning Mistake

My year 8 Geography classes had been working on an assessment about Cheddar Gorge and today was the day they were going to find out how they’d got on. I always allocate a whole lesson dedicated purely to feedback and reflection when I return an assessment but today I added a new activity to our usual repertoire. I asked students to identify their best learning mistake – the one that they’d learnt the most from. This is actually quite an abstract concept, the class I first trialled this with found it tricky. I had another year 8 class after break so did some tinkering and provided a framework to help them structure their answer. I could almost hear both classes’ brains stretching as they completed this activity.

 

FullSizeRenderIMG_1637FullSizeRender

 

 

B-2ZbUUWwAAM2u9

Mistake Marsh
The second activity I created evolved after reading about the concept of a learning pit. I wanted to develop a variation on this theme and add a geographical flavour. Marshes are notoriously difficult to cross, so to is climbing to the summit of a towering mountain – a good analogy I felt for a learning journey. I returned assessments to year 9 and we did our usual review and reflection but added the ‘mistake marsh’ to our menu of activities. This was the final step in our evaluation process. Students were asked to note three mistakes that they’d made in the boxes on the marsh – these represented mistakes they’d made on their learning journey. They then had to decide which mistake was the most important one and write it in the box at the base of ‘Mistake Mountain.’ Once again there was lots of silence and cranking of brains. My hope is that by identifying crucial mistakes they will not make them again.

 

B-3pUPGXEAAAqNG

 

IMG_1791

 

I know that these strategies are not ‘perfect’ yet and that students will need more practise; I plan to revisit and refine as well as devising new activities to get the most out of mistakes. There always has to be a starting point and being afraid to make a mistake shouldn’t be a reason not to have a go!

I feel a bit like that about this first post – it’s the first blog post I’ve written for years and I know that I’ve made lots of mistakes but one thing I know for sure is that I’ll get better 🙂


Leave a reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Skip to toolbar