Playing the game

Let Battle Commence

My year 10s and I recently waved goodbye to their Core science exams for this year. After much celebration and relief we began to knuckle down to the year 11 topics which we were due to commence in the remaining days before they were to leave for work experience and, finally, the summer.

I was down to teach topic 1 of the Edexcel C2 syllabus during this period. For those who are not acquainted with this syllabus, the topic covers the ideas of atomic structure, electronic configuration and atom diagrams. It is my personal belief, which I’m sure others share also, that chemistry is much easier once the fundamental principles of atomic theory and organisation of the periodic table are second nature to the students. As such, I spent a fair bit of time covering this topic to ensure it was concreted into my students minds.

Teaching the periodic table and helping students understand it’s layout is so paramount to their understanding. However, teaching it can become a very monotonous and laborious task. Therefore,  I decided to tackle this in a more game like approach. I had gone over the ideas of the nucleus and it’s structure, and wanted students to apply this to the periodic table and generally familiarise themselves with it. So, we decided to play ‘Periodic Table Battle Ships’.

I simply printed off several copies of the Periodic table, two identical images placed one above another on a piece of A4 paper. Each student had one of these copies for themselves. These were to be turned into our battleship boards.

How To Play:

  • Students can place 3 ships: one 5 elements long, one 4 elements long and the final 3 elements long.
  • Ships can be placed vertically or horizontally on the top copy of the table
  • Students then take it in turns to ask questions about the elements to find where their opponents ships are placed.
  • I asked my class to ask questions based on the elements instead of saying “Is it on Sodium?” for example. I asked them to use atomic number, or atomic mass to identify elements. Sometimes, students took it a step further and asked based on the number of neutrons.

Exposing them to the table in this way gave them the chance to identify trends and patterns for themselves as they looked and posed questions.

There are many ways you could change this task. They could pose questions based on properties, first ionisation energy (for A-level), reactivity with certain substances, states at different temperatures. However and whatever you want your students to get from this task, it can be adapted.

Enjoy!

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