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Reflecting on exams – how can I improve?
March 22, 2015
0
Addressing the common misconceptions.

Usually the best ideas are born out of necessity, having over 100 students sitting either an A level or GCSE exam in the coming weeks marking was becoming the only┬átask I had time for. Whilst marking numerous pieces of work I realised I was writing the same thing over and over and… over. Surely there must be a more efficent/streamlined way of doing this that still remained personal to the student?

I created a marking grid based on the mark scheme and marked a couple of tests to pilot whether I had included everything necessary. I copied and pasted the blank grid as many times as there were students in the class. The grid took between 15 – 20 minutes to create but streamlined the process massively as I marked each test, this was then printed off and attached to the exam paper of each student. As I went through I created a tally of common mistakes on a piece of paper of WWW (What went wells) and EBIs (even better ifs) that were common for the majority, I then used this to create a reflection poster for us to go through as a class as opposed to just talking through the main errors. It was a combination of addressing the common misconceptions and being given the opportunity to react to the feedback they had been given – a colleague introduced me to the concept of “show me growth” which is incorporated here.

After showing they had purposely┬áreacted to the feedback students were given the time to reflect – why had they lost marks and crucially what are their next steps in order to be successful for their forthcoming exams (post it and footstep boxes respectively)?

I feel there are many advantages to these posters –

  • 1) It has streamlined my marking process immeasurably
  • 2) It requires active participation from the students
  • 3) It is taken away and can be used as a revision tool
  • 4) I have further developed this by creating “Show me growth” worksheets of AFL questions that share similar principles to the ones they had already completed so they can use their feedback and improved answers to enable them to make outstanding progress on future tasks.

There are some drawbacks, however, they are fairly time consuming to make initially, they are class specific – I have two year 10 classes but their targets are very different due to the make up of the class and it also needs to be differentiated by ability (I made a higher and foundation sheet for one of the classes). Overall though I’ve had some very positive feedback from the students and colleagues who have utilised this resource.

Personalised to each student and filled in as each test was marked.

Personalised to each student and filled in as each test was marked.

Addressing the common misconceptions.

Addressing the common misconceptions.

 

Completed by the student.

Completed by the student.

 


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